Archive for February, 2013

Valentine’s Day Tips

February 12, 2013

imagesCA0E1BLJ

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/valentines-day-tips.aspx

Moving With Your Pet

February 10, 2013

 

 thCAGZKIUA

 Whether it is a four-hour car ride or an overseas move, traveling with your pet can go smoother if you plan ahead and follow a few easy suggestions:

 Vaccinations:

 RABIES:

 Both dogs and cats require a current rabies vaccination.

 OTHER:

The stress of traveling can make your pet more susceptible to disease.         

Therefore vaccinations are especially important. Dogs should have DHLP, Parvo,  and Bordetella. They should also be on heartworm prevention. Cats should have FVRCP.

Health Certificates:

State Health Certificates are valid for 10 days but check with your carrier if flying.

 International Health Certificates are usually good for 30 days. Your rabies certificate should be carried with you along with the health certificate.

 Quarantine Periods:

Many areas have quarantine periods for pets, even if they are properly vaccinated. Check with your veterinarian about requirements in your specific destination.

 thCAN6KJ1J

Pet Carriers:

If you are flying, make sure your pet carrier is “Airline Approved.” Most airlines require specific reservations for “under-the-seat” carriers. Check with the airline. The appropriate size carrier will allow your pet to stand up, lie down, and turn around comfortably. Acclimate your pet to its carrier well ahead of your travel date. This will make the trip more pleasant for everyone.

 Food & Water:

Feeding your pet on the day of travel is not recommended. It merely adds to motion sickness problems.  Water should always be available.  Take a supply of water with you on car trips to avoid problems from changes in the water content. Take the usual food to avoid sudden diet changes, which often lead to vomiting and/or diarrhea. Stick to a routine feeding schedule.

 Car Travel:

Make frequent stops (every 2 hours) to walk and water your pet.  Never leave a pet unattended in a car, even if the windows are rolled down. Always leash your pet when out of the car to avoid loss or injury,

 As well as being considerate of other people. Be sure the pet is wearing a collar with attached rabies tag and ID tag. Be responsible for cleaning up your pet’s eliminations-plastic bags.

thCADQ963D 

Tranquilization:

 Some pets need tranquilization for travel to prevent motion sickness or hyper excitability. Discuss this with your veterinarian if you think it might be needed.

Please call us with any questions!

-From the veterinarians of Arrow Springs Animal Hospital Dr. Schmidt and Dr. Burris

Teeth Cleaning

February 6, 2013

th

 WHAT IS TARTAR AND GINGIVITIS:

Tartar, or dental calculus, is the buildup of food, bacteria, and other residues on your pet’s teeth that lead to gum infections or gingivitis.

CAN DIRTY TEETH BE HARMFUL TO MY PET?

Dirty teeth will cause bad breath, eventual loss of teeth due to infections; and may even lead to generalized infections due to bacteria entering the blood stream.  Heart disease and kidney disease is very common as a result of “dirty teeth.”

 WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU CLEAN A PET’S  TEETH?

A pet is given a physical exam and any needed laboratory work to insure their well-being before the procedure. Then, the pet is sedated with the same medications utilized in human medicine. Teeth are then hand-scaled, cleaned with ultra-sound equipment, and polished, very similar to a human dentist.  A fluoride treatment is then applied.  Necessary extractions are performed when the teeth’s roots have been destroyed by infection.

 WHAT IS EXPECTED OF ME?

The pet should have no food after midnight the night before your scheduled appointment. Water is allowed free choice at all times. We request that you bring your pet to the hospital by 8 a.m. so that we can start the procedure early in the morning. 

 WHAT ABOUT EXTRACTIONS?

Only the veterinarian can determine which teeth should be extracted, and which loose teeth can be saved.  This is often impossible to determine until the pet is properly sedated, due to the possible pain in the gum area.

 WHAT ABOUT ANTIBIOTICS?

Antibiotics may be given before, and then after the dental cleaning (and possible extractions) to fight any bacteria present.  In many severe infections, antibiotics will be prescribed for several days and then an appointment is scheduled for a recheck.  Be SURE to continue antibiotics until instructed not to do so!  Use the entire contents of any prescribed medications before stopping.

th

 WHAT CAN I DO AT HOME AFTER CLEANING?

Daily use of a pet toothpaste can help to prevent future problems.  Many pets (especially over 5 years of age) will require dental cleaning procedures every 6-12 months to maintain optimum oral hygiene.

Call us with any questions or to make an appointment!

918-455-7107

-From the veterinarians of Arrow Springs Animal Hospital Dr. Schmidt and Dr. Burris